Blog

Blog 1 :


By the time it takes you to read this, millions of plastic bags are produced all over the world. And then we do not even know about the amount of resources that is needed, specially oil. An Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) survey from 2008 showed that only 6.8% of all plastic waste recycled. But what happens with the other 93.2%? Luckily leaders understood the seriousness of the problem and the recycling rate increased to 18.5%. Question is what is the problem with the rest 81.5%? can’t we just burn them?

To get the answer let’s know some merits and demerits of plastic bags.
The only advantage we have here is plastic bags are cheap. But not cheaper than our environment, is it? You are smart enough to understand the importance of environment so let’s skip that part. But for the context we will let you know that environment consists of three elements, AIR, WATER and SOIL and plastic bag is something that hampers all three of them! how? you can simply google it and know. but we have done that homework for you.

So we must ban plastic bags as soon as possible or we will be left with regrets only. As the environment gets destroyed, so do us. Will you ban plastic bags if you find something alternative? Something that will not hamper anything on the environment but surely will make it cleaner? Something whose use will rescue us from global warming? If yes then you are a conscious mind.

There are always alternatives to plastic bags. Paper bags are a possible option but they also take their toll on the environment. The use of trees to increase the production of paper products will also have a negative environmental effect. Besides they might not be cost efficient and tough enough to carry heavy things.

Use of jute is the perfect rescue. It’s not as popular as it should be especially considering its outstanding environmental benefits. Given the increasing focus on today’s environmental issues, jute might just be in for a crack at the big time. Besides jute has a high rate of CO2 assimilation. Studies reveal that the C02 assimilation rate of jute is several times higher than other trees. Studies indicate that, one hectare of jute plants can consume up to 15 tons of carbon dioxide and release 11 tons of oxygen during the jute growing season (about 100 days).
It is an annually renewable resource with a high biomass production per unit of land area and jute products being biodegradable are simply environment-friendly. Moreover, the leaves and crop waste, left out in the fields, are transformed into organic materials, thereby reducing the need for supplementary chemical fertilizers for subsequent crops. While the synthetic substitutes are being considered as the root of many problems, the natural fiber products are proven to be absolutely harmless.

Besides jute made things are tougher than plastics and papers. And cost? A little higher than plastics as it should be but it cannot compete with the value of our environment. We spend a lot of money in many other unnecessary things, can’t we spend a little to rescue the environment?

Blog 2 :

Corchorus Olitorius or Corchorus Capsularis is also known as the golden fiber. You already know what we are going to talk about. Brilliant you are! Yes of-course it’s jute; the second most important vegetable fiber after cotton due to its versatility.

Jute is used chiefly to make cloths for wrapping bales of raw cotton, and to make sacks and coarse cloth. The fibers are also woven into bags, wallets, shoes, bed sheet, table cloths, furniture, show pieces, rustic things, curtains, chair coverings, carpets, area rugs, hessian cloth, and backing for linoleum, paper and many more countless things.

Jute is produced in many areas around the world. India is the largest jute-producing nation, creating nearly 2 million tons of raw fiber every year. The plants have low fertilizer needs and the fiber that they produce is 100% bio-degradable, making it a sustainable as well as inexpensive option for manufacturing. Other major production areas include Bangladesh which produces only slightly less of the plant fiber than India. The total availability of raw jute for 2016-17 is estimated at 11 million bales (1 bale=170kgs). And it is increasing day by day and why shouldn’t it?

People are getting concerned about the threat on their environment and so they are getting involved in rescuing it. We see this as a positive impact. So is our target, to make people more aware about consequences of using poly bags. We assure you, only switching to jute made things from plastics can reduce the environment pollution and global warming to a significant level.

Blog 3 :

Many people may have heard the name of jute but have not seen it. Jute is a gift of Nature. Let’s have a deep knowledge in a short way about this valuable crop.

Jute is a product of South Asia and specifically a product of India and Bangladesh. Nearly 98% of world jute is grown in these two south Asian countries. recent average total world production of jute is of the order of 2465 thousand tonnes a year of which more than 2423 thousand tonnes are grown in the south Asian countries.

Cultivation of jute is quite arduous and painstaking. It has a number of stages of processing namely preparing the land, sowing, weeding, harvesting, retting, extraction of fibre, washing, cleaning and drying etc. It’s a yearly crop and takes about 120 days (April/May-July/August) to complete the process of cultivation.

For centuries, jute has been an integral part of culture of Bengal, in the entire southwest of Bangladesh and some portions of West Bengal. During the British Raj in the 19th and early 20th centuries, much of the raw jute fibre of Bengal was carried off to the United Kingdom, where it was then processed in mills concentrated in Dundee. Initially, due to its texture, it could only be processed by hand until it was discovered in that city that treating it with whale oil, it could be treated by machine.The industry boomed but this trade had largely ceased by about 1970 due to the appearance of synthetic fibers.Margaret Donnelly, a jute mill landowner in Dundee in the 1800s, set up the first jute mills in Bengal. In the 1950s and 1960s, when nylon and polythene were rarely used, one of the primary sources of foreign exchange earnings for the erstwhile United Pakistan was the export of jute products, based on jute grown in Bangladesh. However, as the use of polythene and other synthetic materials as a substitute for jute increasingly captured the market, the jute industry in general experienced a decline.During some years in the 1980s, farmers in Bangladesh burnt their jute crops when an adequate price could not be obtained. Many jute exporters diversified away from jute to other commodities. Jute-related organisations and government bodies were also forced to close, change or downsize. The long decline in demand forced the largest jute mill in the world (Adamjee Jute Mills) to close in Bangladesh.

Blog 4 :

ADAMJEE JUTE MILL TRAGEDY:

1951, a year of pride when Adamjee jute mills were established at Adamjee nagar, Narayanganj, the biggest jute mill in the world. June 30, 2002 a date of shame and loss of our pride. we can no longer say after that day, that we are the largest exporters of jute around the world. nearly a lac of labourers lost their job and a disaster fell down upon the golden days of the golden fiber. initially it was a private company. by June 1955, the mill was ready for commissioning and had 3000 looms and 31200 spindles. The production capacity of the mill was 117 ton of twist and yarn, 953 ton of hessian and 4006 ton of sacking bag.[1] The Adamjee family lost control of the mill in 1971 during the Bangladesh Liberation War. In the early 1970s, polypropylene products began to displace traditional jute products, and the fall of Adamjee Jute Mills began. However, it has managed to survive 1980s with nominal margin. The death of Adamjee Jute Mills started during the 1990s. Finally on 2002 it came to it’s end. In a country where the importance of resource re-allocation for a dynamic economy had not yet been fully understood, this was considered by many a failure, a national disgrace almost.The Government said the mill had incurred a total loss of taka 1,200 crores since nationalisation in 1972. Despite international donor agencies urging that the loss-incurring mill should be closed, previous governments chose not to, fearing the political fallout. Experts believe that ineffective management and corrupt practices, aided by labour leaders, were responsible for the closure of the mill, which was the pride of the country’s industrial sector and had witnessed many mass movements against Pakistani rulers.

Blog 5 :

Jute is salvation:

Environment consists of three elements, AIR, WATER and SOIL and plastic bag is something that hampers all three of them! How?

Air Pollution Due to Plastics:

Air is polluted by the factories that produce them. Polybags are produced from toxic materials such as benzene and vinyl hydrochloride. These chemicals are known to cause cancer, and the manufacturing byproducts contaminate our air and soil. And again to get rid of them we burn them in a bulk quantity which pollutes air too.

Water Pollution by plastics:

Research shows that plastic materials stuck into the water blocks the sewerage and drainage system which results great havoc to marine life as well as to every land creature by causing fatalities as a result of ingestion, starvation, suffocation, infection, drowning, and entanglement. Around the world, an estimated one million birds and 100,000 marine mammals and sea turtles die each year when they become trapped in plastic or eat it, perhaps mistaking it for a tasty treat. It is one of biggest threats to all whales and dolphins throughout the world’s oceans.

Soil Pollution by plastics:

Plastic takes a huge time to biodegrade. Different kinds of plastic can degrade at different times, but the average time for a plastic bottle to completely degrade is at least 450 years. It can even take some bottles 1000 years to biodegrade! So if these plastics get mixed with the soil, the land loses it’s fertility and if some building is built there the foundation becomes weak.
The United Nations Joint Group of Experts on the Scientific Aspects of Marine Pollution (GESAMP), estimated that 60 to 95 percent of the pollution occurs for the waste being plastics debris.

Blog 6 :

Merits of Jute:

Using Jute made products as a substitute of plastic products is the best solution for the problem. Almost every type of product made using plastic can be replaced by jute and those are stronger and better.

But as ill luck it’s not as popular as it should be especially considering its outstanding environmental benefits. Given the increasing focus on today’s environmental issues, jute might just be in for a crack at the big time. Besides jute has a high rate of CO2 assimilation. Studies reveal that the C02 assimilation rate of jute is several times higher than other trees. Studies indicate that, one hectare of jute plants can consume up to 15 tons of carbon dioxide and release 11 tons of oxygen during the jute growing season (about 100 days).
It is an annually renewable resource with a high biomass production per unit of land area and jute products being biodegradable are simply environment-friendly. Moreover, the leaves and crop waste, left out in the fields, are transformed into organic materials, thereby reducing the need for supplementary chemical fertilizers for subsequent crops. While the synthetic substitutes are being considered as the root of many problems, the natural fiber products are proven to be absolutely harmless.

Besides jute made things are tougher than plastics and papers. And cost? A little higher than plastics as it should be but it cannot compete with the value of our environment. We spend a lot of money in many other unnecessary things, can’t we spend a little to rescue the environment?
Jute is a type of vegetable fiber used to make items such as rope, twine, carpet, rugs, hessian cloth, and much more.
Jute is one of the cheapest and the strongest of all natural fibres and considered as fibre of the future. Raw jute is the natural fibre which is extremely eco-friendly. Bangladesh is the biggest producer of natural jute or raw jute fibre both in quantity and quality. The recent mapping of the genome of the jute seed by several Bangladeshi scientists working in collaboration, has opened up a new horizon for the jute sector.
Jute fiber has high tensile strength and low extensibility, which ensures better breathability of fabrics. Jute fiber also used in the production of fabric which enhance its used in various fields of textiles.
Jute mills or jute industries need raw jute for continued production of ropes, jute yarn and twine, jute burlap bags and jute sacks etc. Jute hessian and jute sacking are the two important types of Jute goods which mainly use for packaging agricultural products.
Today Jute has numerous more uses and is used to make paper, non woven textiles, geo textiles and many others. Indeed the product is so versatile that it is said to have thousands of uses and more and more uses are being discovered each day. Certainly due to it being environmentally friendly, it is likely to replace some of the synthetic products which are creating hazards to our earth.